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Trigonometric functions - Wikipedia
The cosine (sine complement, Latin: cosinus, sinus complementi) of an angle is the ratio of the length of the adjacent side to the length of the hypotenuse, so called because it is the sine of the complementary or co-angle, the other non-right angle.

Sine, Cosine, Tangent - Math Is Fun
Sine, Cosine and Tangent. Three Functions, but same idea. Right Triangle. Sine, Cosine and Tangent are the main functions used in Trigonometry and are based on a Right-Angled Triangle.. Before getting stuck into the functions, it helps to give a name to each side of a right triangle:

Cosine -- from Wolfram MathWorld
The cosine function cosx is one of the basic functions encountered in trigonometry (the others being the cosecant, cotangent, secant, sine, and tangent). Let theta be an angle measured counterclockwise from the x-axis along the arc of the unit circle. Then costheta is the horizontal coordinate of the arc endpoint. The common schoolbook definition of the cosine of an angle theta in a right ...

Cosine - math word definition - Math Open Reference
The cosine function, along with sine and tangent, is one of the three most common trigonometric functions.In any right triangle, the cosine of an angle is the length of the adjacent side (A) divided by the length of the hypotenuse (H). In a formula, it is written simply as 'cos'.

Cosine similarity - Wikipedia
Cosine similarity is a measure of similarity between two non-zero vectors of an inner product space that measures the cosine of the angle between them. The cosine of 0° is 1, and it is less than 1 for any other angle in the interval [0,0.5π).It is thus a judgment of orientation and not magnitude: two vectors with the same orientation have a cosine similarity of 1, two vectors oriented at 90 ...

Cosine - definition of cosine by The Free Dictionary
cosine cos θ = b/c co·sine (kō′sīn′) n. Abbr. cos 1. In a right triangle, the ratio of the length of the side adjacent to an acute angle to the length of the hypotenuse. 2. The abscissa at the endpoint of an arc of a unit circle centered at the origin of a Cartesian coordinate system, the arc being of length x and measured counterclockwise from ...

Ontario COSINE Viewer
This application uses licensed Geocortex Essentials technology for the Esri ® ArcGIS platform. All rights reserved.

The Law of Cosines - Math is Fun - Maths Resources
The Law of Cosines (also called the Cosine Rule) says:. c 2 = a 2 + b 2 − 2ab cos(C). It helps us solve some triangles. Let's see how to use it.

Large Scale 3D Printing - Cosine
Cosine Additive is Houston's number one 3D printer and 3D part manufacturer. We offer 3D printers, printed parts, training, and other services. Discover our AM1 machine, and get your parts printed today!

Cosine Group: Joined-Up Thinking For Smarter Sales
Contact Cosine. A round play button. The results painted a consistent picture of an organisation that has capable and trustworthy leaders, strong and embedded DNA and an empowering and involving culture. There is a ...

 

 

 

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